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Saturday, October 1, 2016

Women in Art 278 Magazine: October 2016 -- Read it here!


Women in Art 278 Magazine's October issue is here! Read the magazine online or purchase the magazine. With our diverse collection of artists, we hope you fall madly in love with a few pieces of artwork presented ...  if not, all of them. To learn more about an artist or to view more of her work, click on the arrow at the top corner of the individual artist's page in our online edition. The printed edition has contact information in the directory found in the back of the magazine.

Click here to purchase a digital download or physical copy.
International Shipping available.
Click here to read Women in Art 278 magazine online


  • Aditi Maaheshwar: Indian Folk Arts, Acrylics
  • Adriana Hoban: Mixed Media
  • Alice Leggett: Oil Painting
  • Angie Harris: Photography
  • Barbara Ellis: Acrylics  
  • Bev Donohoe: Drawing - Tangled Line Art ** Cover Page Artist **
  • Christel Roelandt: Acrylic and Oil
  • Inma Cañero: Jewelry
  • Jacqueline Talbot: Ceramic Design
  • Joana Kruse: Book Cover Photography
  • Johanna Hurmerinta: Abstract Oil Paintings
  • Julianne Black: Digital Illustration
  • Kate Probert-Jones: Surface Pattern Design
  • Krissy Whiski: Psychedelic Surreal, Acrylics
  • Liesl Marelli: Photography
  • Maria Kirillova: Glass Painting, Lampworking
  • Maurie Harrington: Watercolor
  • Nicci Peet: 35mm Photography
  • Nikki Frazier: Mixed Media
  • Sandra Viviana Rossi: Acrylics and Oils
  • Sarit Khen: Fused Glass
  • Shanni Ong: Abstract Expressionism
  • Sheila Thomas: Acrylic
  • Shelley Tiffee: Abstract
  • Tanielle Childers:  Acrylic
  • Teresa White: Color Pencil and Fineliner Pen
  • Teri Sokoloff: Art Glass
  • Yamarilet Pacheco: Jewelry and Home Décor








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Sunday, September 25, 2016

Taking the Measures of Sexism in the Arts

I told my English professor that I learned Art History in high school and he asked me what I knew about Louise Bourgeois. I had never heard of her, in fact, I almost exclusively learned about Euro-American and French men in art, literature, and music; the Western Canon is entirely based on the male perspective. Once I questioned why that was, that’s when I learned about systematic oppression of females, and ultimately, feminism

Louise Joséphine Bourgeois
Despite encouraging signs that women are being more represented in the arts, there are still major systemic problems. Don’t get me wrong: women artists are far more recognized for their work today than they were 45 years ago. However, women have been historically denied in the arts and are still inferior in the art world. The institutional power structures actually exist today and make it quite hard for women to achieve artistic excellence on the same footing as men. 

The more closely you consider world art statistics, the more obvious it becomes that decades of post-colonialism, anti-racist, feminist, and queer activism stem from white, American, heterosexual, upper-middle class men. Sexism has been active since the founding of our fathers, and it still goes unrecognized in the culture of art. 

“The men like to put me down as the best women painter. I think I’m one of the best painters,” Georgie O’Keeffe said. 

“I’ve always been terrified every moment of my life — and I’ve never let it keep me from doing a single thing I wanted to do.”

 Sculpture by Bourgeois in the Domestic Incidents
group exhibit at London's Tate Modern Turbine
Hall, 2006. 

Museums


Of all the exhibitions at the Whitney Museum in 2007, 29 percent went to females. Statistics have improved though. In 2000, the Guggenheim Museum in New York City dedicated zero shows by women. Discrimination against women in the arts has become most present in gallery representations and museum exhibitions. In 2014, the well-known Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) had 80 percent male exhibitions. So did New York’s classic Museum of Modern Art (MOMA). 

But the above statistics are in the United States alone. In France and Germany, only 16 percent of female artists were represented in museum exhibitions in 2007. In the United Kingdom, only 22 percent of exhibitions were dedicated to female artists over the course of seven years, according to ArtNews. The facts are imbalanced and the ratio of male-to-female artists in exhibitions is unacceptable. 

Galleries


Gallery statistics show that only 10 to 30 percent of women artists are in galleries, according to ArtNews. Women painters, drawers, and creators are excluded from galleries and put down because of their gender. 

“I’ve always wondered, like, what is so masculine about abstraction? How did men get the ownership over this?” said Cecily Brown in ArtNet News. 

In the Press


In our fast-paced, technology-centered world, women still get less coverage than men in publications, advertisements, and other periodicals. Men are more likely to be on the cover of art magazines than women. For instance, in Artforum, a female artist was only featured on the cover once in 2014. In the magazine’s “Best Of” 2014 issue, just roughly 32 percent of women artists were featured out of 95 slots. 

But art publications aren’t the only periodicals that misrepresent women and emphasize men artists. Male musicians get more radio time than female musicians. Music Machinery published an article on “Gender Specific Listening” and VoiceBunny published a study, “Should You Go With a Male or Female Voice Over?” which both focus on how consumer’s respond to male voices in advertisements versus female voices. 

Males directed 96 percent of the top movies over the past 13 years, according to Glamour Magazine. In the 2014 edition of ArtCompass, 83 of the 100 “Great Artists” were male… that’s 83 percent! Why are all the “great artists” men? 


How to Improve the Facts


The world needs to be more fearless and consistently outspoken when it comes to art inequality, feminism, and women in the arts. If people cannot recognize the truth or accept the fact that women are misrepresented in the art world, then the problem will forever exist. Drawing on the history of feminism and analyzing artist statistics can make you more aware on the growing concerns of sexism. 


-------------  Article by  Gabby Catalano ------------- 

Gabby Catalano is a San Diego web writer, blogger, and social media specialist. My writing focuses are non-fiction, journalism, and reporting

Friday, July 1, 2016

Women in Art 278 Magazine (July 2016)

July2016


Women in Art 278 Magazine's July issue is here! Read the magazine online or purchase the magazine. With our diverse collection of artists, we hope you fall madly in love with a few pieces of artwork presented ...  if not, all of them. To learn more about an artist or to view more of her work, click on the arrow at the top corner of the individual artist's page in our online edition. The printed edition has contact information in the directory found in the back of the magazine.  

Click here to purchase a digital download or physical copy. International Shipping available.
Click here to read Women in Art 278 magazine online


  • Ageliki Alexandridou: Oil on Canvas (Greece)
  • Aldina H Beganovic: Acrylic (Italy) 
  • Ana Dawani: Oil and Acrylic (Jordan)
  • Ava Dadoun: Spray Paint (Canada) 
  • Bijna Balan: Pencil Drawing and Acrylic Painting (Germany) 
  • Carol Bostan: Turkish-Themed Acrylic (United Kingdom)
  • Caron Sloan Zuger: Watercolor (USA)
  • Christiane Kingsley: Watercolor and Acrylic (Canada)
  • Dominique Amendola: Oil Painting (USA)
  • Elaine Smith: Watercolor and Acrylics (USA) 
  • Elena Feliciano: Acrylic and Mixed Media (USA)
  • Elizabeth Cox: Acrylic and Mixed Media (Canada)
  • Elizabetha Fox: Mixed Media (United Kingdom)
  • Ellada Amvrosiadou: Oils, Acrylics, and Pencils (Cyprus)
  • Eunice Warfel: Alcohol Ink (USA)
  • Irina Afonskaya: Oil Painting, Watercolor, and Acrylic (Bulgaria)
  • Isabelle Savard-Filteau: Paint, Photography and Digital Drawing (Canada)
  • Jessica  Cabral: Collage and Mixed Media (USA)
  • Katarzyna Scaber: Acrylic (USA)
  • Laurie Search: Photography (USA)
  • Liesl Marelli: Photography (USA)
  • Lynn Hopwood: Nature Photography (USA)
  • Marilyn McNish: Acrylic on Canvas (Canada)
  • Nikki Dalton: Acrylic (Canada)
  • Peggy Johnson: Acrylic on Stretched Canvas (USA)
  • Rachel Bingaman: Oil Painting (USA)
  • Stephanie Zelaya: Impressionist Abstract
  • Trishia Crane: Oil, Acrylic and Mosaic (USA)
  • Tristen Patriz: Abstract Acrylic (Canada) 


Women in Art 278 (July 2016)
Issue IV, Volume III. Women in Art 278 Magazine showcases women in the arts from across the globe. Art genres include Watercolor, Oil Painting, Photography, Abstract Impressionism, Alcohol Ink, Spray Paint, Pencil Drawing and more. For more information visit www.ART278.org. We welcome new artists.

Thursday, April 14, 2016

The ideal art studio for an intuitive energy artist

Ilisa Millermoon
I'm an Intuitive Energy Artist. When using the method of Intuitive Energy Art to create, you have no preconceived idea of what the final outcome will be. It is always an Adventure! You hone in on your Inner Voice and let your Spirit guide you with the materials you are working/playing with. You do not need to focus on techniques or mechanics because there is no “right” or “wrong” way to express yourself while you are creating. The results are amazing! Often when you look at your creation a week or two later you’ll see images that reflect what your Inner Voice was telling you.

My home is my Sanctuary, my Happy Place, and my studio is my Sacred Space. Your Sacred Space for Creativity can be an entire room or a small table in the corner of your room. Make it clear that this is your Sacred Space for Creativity and no one may use it without your permission. Gather the materials you'd like to work with and organize them in a manner that makes you feel at ease and comfortable in you Sacred Space for Creativity.

Create an Altar with the items that honor your Creative Spirit. The altar serves as an acknowledgment that you value your Creative Spirit. That you truly do hold it Sacred. Your altar can be arranged on a small table, a windowsill or a shelf in a bookcase. Your altar is Sacred and no one else should be permitted to monkey with it. Find items that represent your creativity. This is a reflection of you, feel free to make it completely your own!

Where does my inspiration come from? You may have heard the phrase, "Find your pain and you'll find your Purpose". Growing up in a community that considered women to be "Less Than", by both men and women, it has become my Mission to Celebrate the Strength, Passion and Divinity of Women through my artwork. I'd love to hear from you, and how you've set up your Sacred Space for Creativity!

To learn more about Ilisa & view her porotfolio:  www.ilisamillermoon.com.



Thursday, March 31, 2016

April 2016 (Issue III, Vol III)



Ladies, Gentlemen and all art enthusiasts -- here is our latest issue of Women in Art 278 Magazine. Our April 2016 issue features 36 artists from across the globe. Listed below are their names and art genres. We'd like to extend a special congratulations to Hungarian Artist: Kovács Anna Brigitta!!

As always, we invite you to read Women in Art 278 Magazine online (for free). The magazine is also available as a digital download or printed edition.

Click here to purchase a digital download or physical copy. International Shipping available.
Click here to read Women in Art 278 magazine online



  • Afsaneh Taebi: Painting (Turkey)
  • Agata Lindquist: Acrylic and Mixed Media (USA)
  • Andrea Mendes Ribeiro: Mixed Media (Brazil)
  • Beverly Everson: Digital Art (USA)
  • Britta Glodde: Mixed Media (Germany)
  • Carolina Bertsch: Oil and Acrylic Paintings (Brazil)
  • Christie Brunet: Acrylic, Ink (Canada)
  • Colleen Quinn: Pastel/Charcoal (Ireland)
  • Cynthia Ferrer: Watercolor, Tempera (Argentina)
  • Daniela Giordano: Oil on Canvas (Italy)
  • Gayane Karapetyan: Acrylic (Canada)
  • Heather Hubbard: Nature Photography (USA)
  • Helga Balashova: Photography (Russia) 
  • Ilisa Millermoon: Acrylic Ink (USA)
  • Ines Fugina Malnar: Intuitive Acrylics (Slovenia)
  • Jennie Traill Schaeffer: Oil Painting (USA)
  • Judith Zur: Oil Figurative (United Kingdom)
  • Kovács Anna Brigitta: Watercolor (Hungary)
  • Laura Schlotel: Fused Glass (United Kingdom)
  • Laurie Beringer: Handmade Jewelry (USA)
  • Liesl Marelli: Photography (USA)
  • Lou Lou: Acrylic (USA)
  • Manuela Nicolini: AQVACOLOR 4D (Italy)
  • Marisa Gabetta: Watercolor (Italy)
  • Marriam Bakht: Oil Painting (Pakistan)
  • Mary Tere Perez: Acrylic (Puerto Rico)
  • Michelle Hold: Abstract Gestural Painting (Italy)
  • Nismah Shargawi: Digital Art (Saudi Arabia)
  • Noshaba Bakht: Oils and Mixed Media (USA)
  • Sara Diciero: Painting (Argentina)
  • Spandana Nakka: Oil on Canvas (USA)
  • Susan Christie: Acrylic and Charcoal (Jamaica)
  • Tatiana Flores: Watercolor (Dominican Republic)
  • Tatiana Kiselyova: Visionary Painting (USA)
  • Tatiana Rusanova: Glass Painting (USA)
  • Therese Misner: Figurative Abstract (USA)




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Women in Art 278 (April 2016)
Purchase a print or digital download
Women in Art 278:
Women in Art 278 (April 2016)
Issue III, Volume III. Women in Art 278 Magazine showcases women in the arts from across the globe. Art genres include sculpture, oil painting, photography, acrylic painting, pop art, fine art and more. For more information visit www.ART278.org. We welcome new artists.

Monday, March 7, 2016

How do I check an image size?

We feel your pain. We hear from artists all over the world about their confusion surrounding image size. Painters aren't experts in Photoshop. We get it. So, here are a few videos we found on Youtube that may help guide you towards finding out if your photographed artwork is high resolution enough for the magazine. Keep in mind, our magazine is printed so the DPI must be 300.


Minimum requirements: 300 dpi and 5 inches for the shortest length (side) of the image.

Check out other commonly asked Questions / Answers before submitting your artwork.










Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Welcoming Submissions

Get involved with Women in Art 278 Magazine. Join a community of talented women in the arts and connect with art collectors, art enthusiasts and fellow artists.

Learn more here: click to read our latest newsletter and view or current magazine issue


Friday, January 1, 2016

Kicking off the year ... January 2016's issue is here

January2016This is our favorite issue of the year because it's the PERFECT way to kick off a new year -- with new art, new artists and a variety of inspiring works to feast your eyes on. Our January 2016 issue features 34 artists from across the globe. Listed below are their names and art genres.

As always, we invite you to read Women in Art 278 Magazine online (for free). The magazine is also available as a digital download or printed edition.

Click here to purchase a digital download or physical copy. International Shipping available.
Click here to read Women in Art 278 magazine online


Our cover page artists is Jolante Hesse of South Africa. Congratulations, Jolante!!!


Click to read online
  • April Cook: Photography   (USA)
  • Claire Johnson: Acrylic and Mixed Media   (United Kingdom)
  • Darpan Kaur: Oil   (India) 
  • Ekaterina Fisun: Beaded Jewelry  (Ukraine) 
  • Elisaveta Sivas: Oil on Canvas Painting  (Cyprus)
  • Haejung Choi: Drawing, Narrative Art, Collage  (South Korea) 
  • Inga Vereshchagina: Painting   (USA)
  • Iris Lurkin: Alcohol Based Ink Markers   (Belgium)
  • Jacquet Florence: Art Contemporain - Acrylic  (France)
  • Jolante Hesse: Oil  (South Africa)  ** Cover Page Artist
  • Julia Powell: Oil, Watercolor, Pastel  (USA)
  • Kari Gehrke: Digital Typography  (USA)
  • Karin Leonard: Oil  (USA)
  • Kathy Linden: Acrylic Painting  (USA)
  • Laurie Beringer: Handmade Jewelry  (USA)
  • Liesbeth Verboven: Oil and Acrylic Painting  (Belgium)
  • Liesl Marelli: Photography  (USA)
  • Malia Zaidi: Oil  (USA) 
  • Manda Noorzad: Abstract   (Turkey)
  • Maya Ahmed: Oil Painting   (India)
  • Melissa Bharwani: Acrylics   (Netherlands Antilles)
  • Nicole Gaitan: Acrylic on Canvas with Splatter   (USA)
  • Noora Alsabek: Acrylic  (Sweden) 
  • Noshaba Bakht: Oils and Mixed Media  (USA)
  • Olympia Letsiou: Sculpture    (Greece)
  • Parnita Senjit: Mixed Media   (United Kingdom)
  • Rineke de Jong: Acrylic, Oil, Watercolour, Pencil   (Netherlands) 
  • Roni Ruth Palmer: Acrylic Paintings  (Israel) 
  • Sarah Hinnant: Abstract Modern   (USA) 
  • Sonali Kukreja: Oils and Acrylics   (USA) 
  • Tanya Orme: Abstract Expressionism   (USA) 
  • Taryn Walker: Painting   (South Africa) 
  • Therese Misner: Painting  (USA) 
  • Toni Silber-Delerive: Painting   (USA) 

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